Title IX issues in Wake County

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  • rgwoodall Mar 1, 2014
    Pro

    It takes money to make improvements, stop the crying and support your boosters club, make a donation to your boosters club or even better to the sport that you support. Not sure about your school but I know that the H.S. we support has a account for each sport and if you cant make a monetary donation volunteer your time. thanks

  • High and Tight or In Your Ear Jan 27, 2014
    Rookie

    Tarheelfan41 brings up some very solid points. I do know of some softball coaches in the area that do a great job on maintaining their softball fields from what they have to work with. I do have to disagree with one statement you made.
    "Softball should have equal access to all the supplies need to carry out their tasks." The key word being "should". The bottom line is that they don't even come close to having the assets to compare with baseball. Look at every high school in the county and you visualy see the difference. Even something as simple as the pile of red clay or dirt piled up by the baseball field. I could go on but that would be trivial.
    I do love the passion you have tarheelfan41. It is folks like you that bring subjects like this to the forefront.
    hatoiye

  • tarheelfan41 Jan 26, 2014
    Veteran

    A touchy subject for sure. I too am 100% for equal opportunity and access. I know Wake County tries and strives for equality. I know when the baseball team at one school wanted to build dugouts (why were they not built when the fields were constructed is beyond me) through donations and volunteers they were not allowed unless they also built softball field dugouts. Softball did not raise the money or get a donation to have it done yet the school/wake county said no, not until you can build softball dugouts too. It worked both fields got them. Title 9 worked.

    Now to address the difference in the condition of the playing fields. If it is due to the baseball coaches hard work the baseball fields are in better shape we still have a problem. It is the school/county's responsibility to hire an equally enthusiastic softball coach willing to do the work needed to have equal condition fields. They were able to find a baseball coach willing to bust his hump to maintain great fields they should also find that same type softball coach. Its their job. Period. Unless you are TRYING to convince the world only baseball coaches are they type to go the extra mile for their team. Let the softball coach know they are expected to maintain the fields to a high level, the coach is required to have the their teams work on the field for a half hour before every game manicuring the field, a half our after every practice and every game working the field to perfection. It is a rich tradition in baseball the PLAYERS take care field and they take a great deal of pride in doing so. Same should be expected of softball. Softball should have equal access to all the supplies need to carry out their tasks. Its up to the school to require the softball coaches to carry it out. If the baseball fields have high standards in field appearance the school should require the same from the softball team/coach. If the coach falls short of the mark find a coach that will. Its the job of sc

  • rgwoodall Dec 8, 2013
    Pro

    Thankyou Mickey Bridgers and Keith Durham for the hard work and time you guys spend to make South Johnston Softball and Baseball fields two of the nicest in the state.

  • kellyhunsucker537 Dec 2, 2013
    Rookie

    I get my rank up

  • BattlingBishop 5 Mar 29, 2013
    Sports Legend

    ^rdc

    Agreed 100%!

    Entitlement Mentality = Professional Moocher

  • rdc1214 Mar 29, 2013
    Pro

    I have been to many a Baseball and Softball game in wake county and I can tell you for a fact the toilet paper is terrible everywhere.

  • BattlingBishop 5 Mar 28, 2013
    Sports Legend

    @ontheweed

    Well, being that you've spoken to the coach, the AD, the principal, school board members/attorneys, etc., & found nary a reasonable soul to lend an ear, you should probably seek legal advice from a disinterested party.

    @redflame

    Tough economy!

    @redweed

    1 = 2

  • redflamebball Mar 28, 2013
    Veteran

    Now the toilet paper in the girls softball bathrooms with this thin paper that breaks off when you try to roll it off the roll. The paper in the baseball stadium is soft and easy to use....why??

  • ntheweeds Mar 28, 2013
    All Star

    BattlingBishop 5...dude seriously you don't thing I have already gone this route..it doesn't really matter what you say, the facts don't change that if these inequities are not fixed Wake County Schools will have to make it right. The school is a part of a larger organization.

  • Jumbo Mar 28, 2013
    Pro

    Reading this forum I just start laughing. I have to agree with a comment its up to the coaches that is their responsibility. I have had a chance to go to a couple of Triton High School softball and baseball games in Harnett County. They have 2 of the finest looking fields in the state. I give 2 thumbs up to who ever coaches the softball team. Their field mirrors the baseball field and is probably one of the finest complexes in the state.

  • BattlingBishop 5 Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    "Why is Wake County not taking care of their softball fields like they do the baseball fields?" posted by thereddestofflames

    The question is what it is. Fanning the Flames specifically inquired about the care of certain fields. If it was referring to concessions, batting cages, equipment, unis, etc., then it should have clarified in the beginning.

    Fanning the Flames has a history of doing just that. If this really is a concern for Flames, it should follow proper procedure versus creating a thread on a HSOT forum. Allow me.........

    Speak to the coach first. If unhappy, speak with the AD. If undies' are still bunched, speak with principal. If anxiety continues, contact the local school board/attorneys and get clarification regarding their policies on such matters, etc. If this fails to straighten out the quivering chin, I suggest Flames & Co. do all the work, buy the unis, fix the field, host a fundraiser, etc.

    And Flamesy, I support equality 100% but there is a right way to go about things, ma'am. G'day!

  • lbeck37439 Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    I with you on that wendellboy.Just a little hard work from the parents and the coaches all it takes. Dont get mad if you get beat by a team that has a better field then you do, and then yell title 9.

  • wendellboy10 Mar 27, 2013
    Pro

    Agree with lbeck, that issue at Richmond was insane and should have won a suit. I just haven't seen something like that around here. I guess to get off my soapbox I'm all for the school making sure that things are equitable with what they provide, that is only what is right. However, a lot of things are now coming from involved parents and dedicated coaches and to say that that other programs shouldn't be able to get these upgrades/uniforms/etc because softball parents/coaches aren't willing to do the same isn't right either.

  • dfmlythr Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    (Ibeck)

    Yes the key is the school is paying for every dime.

  • lbeck37439 Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    well that one needed to be won, that field was so bad, plus that did find that the school was footing the bill for and the up keep and upgrades to the football and baseball fields, that is like mis-using funds. Who is footing the cost for the upgrades not the county the school.

  • dfmlythr Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    In the southern part of the state Title 9 has won 100 percent of the time. Great example Richmond County Softball. Google it.

  • wendellboy10 Mar 27, 2013
    Pro

    musty- you are correct. I think the issue is, however, that a lot of the things you just mentioned (uniforms, batting cages, etc) in my experience have come from coaches doing fundraising and/or building it themselves. In the schools I have been at, the school did provide a set of uniforms every so many years to each team. However, through individual fundraising our baseball teams generally had a new top every couple of years. Softball parents generally cried foul when we would roll out with new equiptment, but what the school provided was equal, the extras came from the parents.

    Same with the batting cages, when they were built they were built through fundraising/donations of baseball parents. At the schools I've worked at softball teams were allowed to use them, but baseball had priority in the cages since it was their work that got the cages built (When I say cages I mean the cages at different schools. Each stop only had one batting cage). This often made softball parents upset because they had to alter practice schedules or stay later to use the cages when baseball was done.

    Not saying this is the case everywhere, but in my experience in various parts of WCPSS it has been the case. Just my two cents.

  • 1975musty Mar 27, 2013
    Pro

    Cut some slack fellas. what redflame is trying to say, but struggling to get across is NOT how the grass looks. It the equipment that is provided. If the school/county has someone spraying or fertilizing one field, then they should be doing BOTH. Correct me if I am wrong though, some schools play on fields that are owned by Parks & Recreation Departments. If this is the case, then that is a completely different argument. If a school has a batting cage provided for one team, then they need to provide one for the other. If they buy new uniforms for one team they should be on a rotation so every team gets them equally. If the team raises their own money and provides for themselves, that is another discussion. Yes coaches spend their free time on their own program. Title IX is not going to touch this. Redflame only wants equality.If she feels she a program is being treated unfairly, then she needs to contact the school AD, the principal and if not satisfied with the answer then the county AD.

  • ntheweeds Mar 27, 2013
    All Star

    Guys ultimately it is the County's responsibility. Ask any lawyer they will tell you. I love high school sports and at my child's school the coach does a great job. I don't think you understand redflames argument. It is not the field. It's the equipment, which bus they get to take, the bleachers, concession stand, bathrooms, the fence, scheduling, uniforms ect. The list goes on and on Batting cages cost money

  • BenjaminDisraeli Mar 27, 2013
    Towel Boy

    Redflame- based on the tone of the posts, there is only one person getting defensive here and it appears to be you. The rest of us are merely trying to explain to you that your issue is not with the county. Your issue is with the head coach. If he wants a batting cage, build one. If the field isn't as nice as the baseball field, go out there and work on it. Caring for a ball field isn't something that takes a weekend and then you're done with it. If you want your fields to look as nice as the baseball field, grab a sprayer and some weed killer and get to work.

  • BattlingBishop 5 Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    @redflamebball

    Tissue, ma'am, or a box of 'em? If it bothers you that much, I suggest you grab a rake, sit on a mower, or do something to make a difference. The baseball fields I played on always looked nice due to the efforts of the coaches & players. Stop whining & stop making accusations while you're at it. Thank ya kindly, ma'am.

  • kmagnusson Mar 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    Entitled IX

  • lbeck37439 Mar 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    redflame trying to knock one mans hard work,cause the other man is to lazy to get off his but and work for something.This world has alot of people now day looking for a handout instead of rolling up their sleves and doing the work.

    Redflame eye for eye

  • redflamebball Mar 26, 2013
    Veteran

    just watch and see what happens..ya'll want to make excuses..bottom line is that there is little a softball coach can do to make up for not having a batting cage when baseball has one...from a legal standpoint and you can confirm this with NC State or Carolina or even Duke..if baseball has the best baseballs then softball has to have the best softballs. If baseball has a hitting cage with a concrete then softball should have the same facility upgrades. Wake has to approve those upgrades even if the boosters are paying for them. These are the facts my friends no my opinion. The county is responsible for what they approve to be build or upgraded on their property. That is what the law says...now it is apparent that I have ruffled some feathers...that is a good thing because when folks become defensive...well there is some truth to it...just sayin fellows

  • RDUBball Mar 26, 2013
    Bench Warmer

    I know at Harnett Central, the current condition of the baseball field is due to very hard work by a motivated Coach and a baseball team/family.

  • BenjaminDisraeli Mar 26, 2013
    Towel Boy

    I think the point that is trying to be made here that you seem to be missing redflame is that the issue you have needs to taken up with the coach at whatever school you are complaining about not the county as a whole. The system in place is that the individual coaches are responsible for field maintenance and understanding that fact, any issues with field maintenance would therefore need to be addressed by the individual coach and not the county.

  • BenjaminDisraeli Mar 26, 2013
    Towel Boy

    I was going to mention Holly Springs and Fuquay both as examples where the baseball and softball fields both appear to be in excellent shape, but lbeck beat me to it.

  • lbeck37439 Mar 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    the county is doing a great job with these Softball Fields

    Fuquay
    Garner
    East Wake
    Middle Creek (oh thats the town)
    Holly Springs
    Apex
    Green Hope

  • wendellboy10 Mar 26, 2013
    Pro

    Just as a point of fact guys, Title IX was about having equal access to sports. The fact that we are arguing softball vs. baseball seems to say that WCPSS is in compliance....

    http://www2.ucsc.edu/title9-sh/titleix.htm

  • lbeck37439 Mar 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    How many softball coaches put in the time on their fields as the baseball coaches do? The ones that do, have the fields to show for it.

    Redflamebball lets just do away with sports, to make guys like you happy that are always looking for a reason to sue someone.Frist it was the DEAD PERIOD now its TITLE IX.

  • wendellboy10 Mar 26, 2013
    Pro

    redflamebball- if you remember correctly the Title IX lawsuit that had been filed against WCPSS has been settled, thus they are either a) satisfied with the settlement or b) understood the limited outcomes of their case. As someone who has been around WCPSS for a long time I have yet to see a softball field that was not safe to play on. Generally the school provides the resources to maintain a safe playing environment.

    The fact that there are few (if any) softball fields that "look better" (your words, not mine) than baseball fields have nothing to do with a safe playing environment. Generally the baseball coaches and baseball parents go above and beyond the minimum required level because they have a vested interest in the program. That is not to say that softball parents/coaches do not have the same interest, but for one reason or another it just seems that baseball parents and coaches are more apt to put in the time/$$/work above what the school provides. The "Look" of a field often falls upon the amount of work the coach is willing to put in on the field.

    I have been a coach at three different schools. I can say without exception that baseball and softball were treated as equals from the school's point of view. If soemthing was needed in field maintence it was given. If something was needed for safety, it was provided. Thus, compliance with Title IX. I will also say that the baseball fields "looked" better in each case because the coach was out there 12 months a year treating the grass, cutting it, maintaining the edging, fertilizing, etc. At each school I've been at the softball coaches generally were around their facility a month or so before the season started and then were gone when it ended. These are not opinions, only facts.

  • redflamebball Mar 26, 2013
    Veteran

    Ben..you just made my case even stronger. There is no question, that legally the County is responsible for any building, classroom, workshop, field house, storage area or out house be up to code. The Title IX laws are not just for sports, they transcend through all parts of the educational system. The County receive Federal money and because of that they have a responsibility to fair treatment of both girls and boys facilities. Notice the term "fair" as opposed to equal. Equal will never happen and honestly should not be. Everyone knows that football is the bread winner both in college and high school. and we all know that female sports don't draw well enough to be profitable but that does not change the law.

    Find me one softball field that looks better than a baseball field in Wake County..that is a joke..which one is it...Athens Drive..not..Cary...not...Sanderson..not...which one mr smarty pants...

  • olddb39 Mar 26, 2013
    Veteran

    Excellent point^^

  • BenjaminDisraeli Mar 26, 2013
    Towel Boy

    I would avoid statements like "Why is Wake County not taking care of..." It is a gross generalization to assume that every baseball field in the county is in better shape than every softball field in the county. I do agree with lbeck that field maintenance generally falls under the purview of the school, not the county which means it is normally left to the coaches. I know for a fact that is the case here in Harnett County. The baseball field at HC was garbage the last few years and all of a sudden, a new coach is hired and that place looks like the field of dreams. I also agree that it is issues like this that will cause schools just to drop these sports rather than deal with lawsuits. Why would a school district want to risk a massive lawsuit for softball (which is non-revenue at just about every school in America) and baseball (which is non-revenue at most schools)?

  • lbeck37439 Mar 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    see people like you are going to be the reason why sports will be drop for high schools. Think about that one. all over little Sue didnt have a field like little Billy does. Well most of the baseball fields look like they do, cause of the parents and the Booster Clubs not the county.

  • redflamebball Mar 26, 2013
    Veteran

    check this out if you don't believe me
    http://www.athleticbusiness.com/articles/article.aspx?articleid=2065&zoneid=3

  • redflamebball Mar 26, 2013
    Veteran

    Wake County's responsibility you cranky old man

  • redflamebball Mar 26, 2013
    Veteran

    lbeck..you are not an attorney...I know everyone appreciates you copying and pasting all of this stuff onto this forum, but you need to know that trying to silence me or anyone else will not work. Look at the rulings that have come down recently particularly concerning a school district in Maryland that ignored complaints for years. It came back to bite them in the rear.

  • lbeck37439 Mar 25, 2013
    Sports Legend

    MYTH: It is not fair that Title IX requires equal spending on men's and women's programs because the men's programs bring in all of the school's money.

    FACT: Title IX does NOT require equal spending on men's and women's programs, and less than 12% of college athletic programs actually make a profit.

    http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/home/advocate/title-ix-and-issues/what-is-title-ix/title-ix-myths-and-facts

  • lbeck37439 Mar 25, 2013
    Sports Legend

    http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/en/home/advocate/title-ix-and-issues/what-is-title-ix/standard-language-of-title-ix

  • lbeck37439 Mar 25, 2013
    Sports Legend

    I. Participation

    The first compliance prong of Title IX deals with overall sport and athletic participation offerings available for men and women. A three-part test for participation opportunities determines if institutions provide female and male students with equal athletic opportunities. In order to comply, institutions must pass one of these three tests:

    1.Proportionality: That’s a big phrase and a chance for you to use a little math. The first test means to compare the ratio of female to male participants in the athletic program with the ratio of female to male full-time students (undergraduates for intercollegiate investigations). If the resulting ratios are equal, the school is most likely in compliance in this area of Title IX.

    2.History and Continuing Practice: Has your school shown a history and continuing practice of program expansion for the underrepresented sex? The courts have been firm in noting that the word “continuing” is important when using the second test. Many schools added considerable numbers of women’s teams in the 1970s but either kept the status quo or decreased opportunities during the 1980s. Those changes occurred quite long ago. So, let’s stay focused on our current generation of young people and their athletic opportunities.

    3.Effectively Accommodating Interests and Abilities: Are the interests and abilities of the underrepresented sex fully and effectively accommodated by the current program? In the third test, the key words are “fully and effectively.” Educational institutions that offer athletic programs are required to effectively accommodate the interests and abilities of their students. Under Title IX, these institutions must provide opportunities for individuals of each sex to participate in sports, as well as provide those individuals with competitive team schedules.


    II. Athletic Financial Assistance

    The second major compliance prong of Title IX encompasses athletic financial assistance. The only monetary requirement of Title IX deals with the area of scholarships. Scholarships must be allocated in proportion to the number of female and male students participating in intercollegiate athletics. Funding for women’s and men’s programs does not have to be equal, but a significant disparity in funds does suggest that institutions could be found non-compliant in other program areas.

    III. Treatment

    This third compliance prong of Title IX requires equivalence in other athletic benefits and opportunities and includes all other program areas not previously covered. Title IX does not require that each men’s and women’s team receive exactly the same services and supplies, but it looks at the entirety of the treatment the men’s and women’s programs receive as a whole. The equivalence of overall treatment is measured on the basis of eleven criteria. We have listed them here and provided a brief explanation of the legal standard for each.

    Special Note: For each of the treatment items described below (a-k), you will see what the law evaluates and the legal language that should be evident in your documentation and best drives the process towards meeting the standard of the law. While it may feel redundant, use it often and well to support your objectives.

    a) Locker Rooms, Practice and Competitive Facilities looks at the quality, maintenance and availability of the facilities provided for practice and competitive events; the exclusivity of use of the facilities; the preparation of facilities for games and practices; and the availability, exclusivity and quality of locker and team rooms.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Facilities are one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

    b) Equipment and Supplies is determined in examining the quality, amount, suitability, maintenance and replacement, and availability of equipment and supplies. A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable.

    Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Equipment is one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

    c) Scheduling of Games and Practice Times is based on the number of competitive events offered per sport, the number and length of practice opportunities, the time of day for practice sessions, the number of pre-season and post-season competitive opportunities, and the time of day competitive events are scheduled.

    Under Title IX, a school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Scheduling, including the scheduling of game and practice times, is one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs. Specifically, men’s and women’s programs must have equal access to “prime-time” game and practice times. The nature of what constitutes “prime time” may be different depending on the sport, season and school, but a common example of a compliance issue would be if the men’s basketball team played all of its games at 7 p.m. on a Friday nights while the women always played at 5:30 p.m.

    d) Publicity encompasses the availability and quality of sports information personnel, access to other publicity resources for men’s and women’s programs, and quantity and quality of publications and other promotional devices featuring men’s and women’s programs.
    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable.

    Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Publicity services are one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs. Specifically, schools have an obligation to ensure that both its men’s and women’s programs have equal access to publicity resources and that the quantity and quality of publications and other promotional devices featuring men’s and women’s programs are equitable. Publicity resources include school support groups like cheerleaders, band, and dance teams.

    e) Coaching examines the equivalence in the availability of qualified full-time and part-time coaches, assistant coaches and graduate assistants; assignment of coaches with comparable training, experience and other professional qualifications; and equitable compensation of coaches, including rate of compensation, duration of contract andconditions for contract renewal (taking into account experience, duties and working conditions).

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Coaching services are one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs. Specifically, schools have an obligation to ensure that the quantity and quality of staffing for men’s and women’s programs is equitable.

    f) Travel and Daily Allowance encompasses modes of transportation, housing furnished during travel, length of stay before and after competitive events, daily allowance provided to the teams, and dining arrangements for the teams.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Travel and expenses are one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs. Specifically, schools have an obligation to both its men’s and women’s programs to ensure the quantity and quality of travel and accommodation expenses for men’s and women’s programs are equitable. This includes the type of transportation used to transport teams, the quality of hotels and places of accommodation used, and the types of restaurants and services provided to teams when they travel.

    g) Academic Tutoring includes the availability of tutoring for the men’s and women’s programs; qualifications, training and experience of tutors provided; employment conditions of the tutors for the men’s and women’s programs, including compensation, term and length of contracts; and the number of students tutored per session.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Academic tutoring is one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

    h) Provision of Medical Training Facilities and Services includes the availability of medical personal and assistance, including health, accident and injury insurance coverage; availability and quality of weight training and conditioning facilities; and availability and qualifications of athletic trainers.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Medical training, facilities and services are benefits that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

    i) Provision of Housing and Dining Facilities and Service pertains to housing provided and special services, such as laundry facilities, parking spaces and housekeeping services.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Provision of housing and dining facilities and service is one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

    j) Recruitment of Student Athletes refers to whether coaches and athletic personnel serving female and male athletes are provided with substantially equal opportunities to recruit, whether the financial and other resources made available for recruitment meet the needs of the men’s and women’s programs, and whether the differences in benefits, opportunities and treatment of prospective men and women athletes affect their recruitment.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Recruitment of student-athletes is one benefit that must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

    k) Support Services includes the amount of administrative, secretarial and clerical assistance provided to the women’s and men’s programs.

    A school is obligated to ensure that the overall benefits and treatments of the female and male programs are comparable. Under Title IX, budgets for men’s and women’s teams do not have to be equal, but the bottom line is that the benefits provided must be equal. Support services must be equally provided to the men’s and women’s programs.

  • lbeck37439 Mar 25, 2013
    Sports Legend

    Wow go help the coach, and go read what title IX is all about. The county dont take care of the baseball fields.

  • olddb39 Mar 25, 2013
    Veteran

    Seriously? Here we go again.

    The reason is usually simple. The baseball coach takes care of the baseball because he likes having a nice playable surface for his program. Softball coaches usually don't put in the time and energy that the baseball coach does. It is akin to the football coaches are usually the ones that care about the maintenance of the stadium field.

    This is not a Title IX issue unless you want to start making it so that the baseball coach can have his field nice without any effort as well.

  • redflamebball Mar 25, 2013
    Veteran

    Why is Wake County not taking care of their softball fields like they do the baseball fields?

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