Does Winning Mean Anything

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  • waggle right Feb 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    @lbeck. the same thing happens with baseball, you travel ball, select ball, little league, etc. There are more teams than players and some kids end up playing on more than one team. But the important thing is that daddy got his son a team to play on. LOL

    @cutty, I also agree with you on your points.

    @twilsonsr. I agree with you as well with your coaches stand point. There is nothing better than seeing one of your former players as a successful person 5 years after you coached them. But some players and a lot of parents are more concerned about how many points little johnny gets and how much playing time, and is their a scout in the stands and although you helped him get a B average in school, they are looking beyond that. And I really hate it when a parent looks at their star basketball player or football player as their cash cow!

  • twilsonsr Feb 27, 2013
    Rookie

    Cutty, good point..Yes to some of these kids winning is everything especially when it comes to sports because for some that's the only W they have in the win column in their game of life. For me, it is definitely not about the money, it is about the mission. For a kid that struggles academically, I will work to aid them in getting a better understanding because their future is reliant upon educational learning. As a coach, I will run through a wall for any of my athletes and they know it. In turn, I demand the best efforts from them..in or out of the classroom, on or off the field or the court. We (teacher/coaches) are so much more than our title and those of us who truly are dedicated to the craft are trying to help shape these young men (that's what I coach) into the best that they can be. To me, that's winning.

  • hsfootballraleigh Feb 27, 2013
    All Star

    Ibeck, yup, same thing goes on between the parents and coaches

  • cutty102306 Feb 27, 2013
    All Star

    For those in these positions administrators, teachers, coaches, counselors, parents, academic advisors, or anyone in a position to help the child you all are held to a standard in which the best interest of the child is the focus. Agreed that each of the positions I named don't always work together but please don't forget why you signed up for your job if it's money then you will never understand, if you don't want kids protect yourself from having them, if a player has a desire to play at the collegiate level don't discourage the kid because dad comes to the games drunk and doesn't like the way you coach, if a kid isn't the smartest in the classroom but he has a killer jump shot should he not deserve the same effort in his education that you would give a national honor student, if an athlete has flaws he is not alone everyone around him or her has them no matter the position and if you are in any of these positions your job is to educate, protect, advise, compromise, uplift, and give the child your best effort at whatever their interests are whether it's a ball or a book. Yes to some of these kids winning is everything especially when it comes to sports because for some that's the only W they have in the win column in their game of life.

  • lbeck37439 Feb 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    Heres whats going on,10 years ago if a kids was Failing in school,the parents would ask the kid why hes was failing. Now days the parents are asking the Teacher why ARE YOU failing my kid.

  • hsfootballraleigh Feb 27, 2013
    All Star

    I think there are some good aau you teams, but I'd the coach is in it for the wrong reasons it ruins the kids and their mindset

  • twilsonsr Feb 27, 2013
    Rookie

    Great points 1975musty.

  • 1975musty Feb 27, 2013
    Pro

    parents need to step back and refocus on what is important. once they do that the next step is finding someone they trust to coach their child. trust means to be honest. if johnny or susie isnt good enough or needs to improve in an area then they need to be told. when coaches dont point out the areas needed to improve that should be the first indicator that they do not need to be coaching in the first place. no player is complete. everyone needs to improve. yes there are high school coaches that do this, but i believe there are far more aau coaches due to the nature of the system. to be a coach at the high school level requires an education. there are some great aau coaches. some have the education but there are far more that do not. aau coaches that undermine what the high school coaches do are the very problem. society has set up the athletes for failure. the everybody wins mentality makes it so a kid is going to listen to someone blowing smoke before someone being honest. parents get caught up in the emotion of being a parent instead of stepping back and letting coaches coach. the sport is in trouble if it continues to move in this direction.

  • twilsonsr Feb 27, 2013
    Rookie

    Wendellboy10, well said. I agree that it is a combination of things that are hurting the young athletes. As a high school coach, I can't tell you how many times I hear about a kid being an AAU All-Star. The fact of the matter is that when the team does well, people get noticed. The challenge is that we live in such a "ME" society that we lose focus of what is important. Personally, I would rather coach a kid with less talent, but a team attitude and a strong work ethic than a "wannabe all-star" that has attitude problems. If these kids REALLY want to get noticed, they should make the GRADES in the classroom first, be a hard-working and determined athlete second. If parents put as much emphasis on grades as they do getting their "ALL-STAR" exposure, they would probably find the path to success a little easier. Sorry, off my soapbox now. I just hate seeing kids with the talent to play at the next level, whether D1, D2, or D3, blowing their opportunities because their focus is misplaced.

  • lbeck37439 Feb 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    AAU is part of the problem cause it use to be the very best players played it, not you have all the water down levels of AAU. Players and parents think that if their kids is playing in AAU.One they are very good, Second that they are just as good as the ones playing at the top level, and they too will get to play D1 ball. Until they stop letting every Daddy form a team after his kid doesnt make the kids he tried out for, or the parent gets mad with the coach cause son isnt playing and forms his own team. Bottom line is sometimes you just have to tell the player and the parents that Johnny isnt that good.

  • wendellboy10 Feb 27, 2013
    Pro

    I see a combination problem here. As someone who has been around athletics his whole life, I see parents gravitating toward those who will get their students the most "exposure" or who have coaches that tell them how good Johnny is. In today's society there are enough people out there who will tell you what you want that parents will find them. There are very few people out there who really want to hear the truth (Many will say they do, but when faced with reality they tend to get upset and run). This is true with AAU, High School, Showcase, all the way down to Middle School where when a kid is cut it is crazy because "he was a pop warner all star" or "He played on an AAU national championship team". The "everyone gets a trophy" mentality has eroded a lot of the drive and determination and "want to" of a young athlete.

  • BattlingBishop 5 Feb 27, 2013
    Sports Legend

    @ kmagnusson

    Agreed 100%. I always get a kick out of those who say, "Hate the game, not the player." The games are great & always have been. Why hate the games? It's the players with 'tudes I have an issue with because you can't coach 'em. Hating the games is just an attempt to justify & cover bad attitudes. In other words, it's the bass ackwards approach.

  • hsfootballraleigh Feb 27, 2013
    All Star

    Not ALL aau teams are bad, there are some good programs who aren't trying to leech for your money

  • six72000 Feb 27, 2013
    Pro

    ts not am AAU issue its a false sense of entitlement. When someone is constently telling you how go you are and not the things you can do to improve as a player and person you do get an I mentality.
    At the same time when your friends and family are talking about how good you dribble or that you can dunk that doesnt help either. ESPN has nothing to do with that and neither does AAU it starts with those closest to the player. Being given everything and never earning anything. So while you are trying to wow scout with you and 1 mixtape stuff, or you dunk in the open court. Someone esle is showing them the ability to think and make basketball plays. Its this mentality that has NC especially the raleigh area as talented as we are way behind the chicagos, dallas,tx and georgia in terms of recruiting hot beds. Patents friends of these athletes and knowledgeable people need to share that when in state schools go out of state to recruit prospects for BCS school we,north carolina, are the ones losing out. Be the exception like a TJ Warren or a Terry Henderson. Work hard earn it and learn how to play the game not just worry about mixtapes and highlight videos.

  • kmagnusson Feb 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    Bad attitudes abound. I see in every game regardless of the sport.

  • hsfootballraleigh Feb 26, 2013
    All Star

    The kids are influenced by pro athletes who may not be selfish, but they think that THEY have to do everything on their own to get where THEY want to go. They want to win, they want to play college. There are not as many team players.

  • BattlingBishop 5 Feb 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    Welcome to the "me" generation.

  • sweetnsour13 Feb 26, 2013
    Pro

    Good topic lbeck. To answer your question, unfortunately, NO. It's more about "I", "my", "me" and "what have you done for me lately?".

  • waggle right Feb 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    I also think that AAU has changed the game as well. In AAU ball its about trying to get a scout to see you and what you can do. That carries over to high school ball for some players. I think there is definitely and I in AAU.

  • BattlingBishop 5 Feb 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    There is no "I" in team. The team should always come first & if a player & his parents are not down with that, move along. Pro ball has pretty much ruined HS & college ball because a lot of these kids think they're the next best thing. Hate to break the news to ya, but only a select few will make it & those numbers get even smaller in terms of players becoming stars at the highest levels.

    lbeck - MLB has been around for over 140 years. During that time, approx. 18,000 players have played in the Majors. Of that 18,000 to play, only 167 can claim a career .300 BA, only 28 can claim to have collected 3,000 hits, & only 18 can claim both.

    Point - whether it's baseball, football, or hoops, it's going to be a challenge to go all the way. It takes a combination of skill & luck. Lots of talented players, just not enough teams to go around when you think about it in the big scheme. I haven't looked at the numbers for the NFL/NBA but I imagine it's a similar situation.

    Topic - Winning should always be the primary goal of any team. Team first, me second, & the rest will take care of itself. IMO

  • lbeck37439 Feb 26, 2013
    Sports Legend

    Over the last few years it seems like winning has become less important to the players. Seems like all they want to do is get looked at so they might have a chance to go play ball. Biggest thing is they act like they are bigger than the team, and if you try to tell them something they act like they know it all. Has ESPN help create this? Its almost like when a team wins a title and the first thing some folks say, well they were not the best team that year, Sorry but they were the only team that didnt lose the last game they played in the playoffs.

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